Lunge Infographic

Published in: on March 14, 2010 at 4:50 pm  Leave a Comment  
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A Couple of Things

First, I want to applaud Cotto and Pacquiao for a great fight – I was rooting for Cotto, but Manny earned the win.

Second, some great rapier drill videos from Tom Leoni after the jump.

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Published in: on November 18, 2009 at 11:55 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Tampa Area Fechtschule

I’ve gone out to this Tampa WMA group a few times, now, and I’ve had a ton of fun. Each person is at a different level in the different weapons they practice, but everyone seems eager to learn and serious about sticking with the historical art.

Published in: on October 13, 2009 at 10:09 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Tom Leoni Video

Tom Leoi taught a class at WMAW called “Drill to Fight.” Fortunately for us, video was captured, and you can (should) go see it here.

It’s a great class on learning Italian rapier.

Published in: on October 1, 2009 at 10:38 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Exciting News – Agrippa Book!

Ken Mondeschein has done us all the favor of translating Agrippa’s fencing treatise!

You can buy it here, and anyone who is interested in rapier in any form should buy this book. It is only $20, which is a phenomenal price for an english translation. The Thibault translation is currently selling for about $40, Meyer for more than $50, and Tom Leoni’s fabulous Fabris translation appears to be over a hundred dollars not what it’s out of print – I believe it was about $50 new.

Agrippa’s treatise is shorter, but it is just as important as (in some ways more important than) Fabris’ or Meyer’s works.

Buy it, read it, love it.

Published in: on September 23, 2009 at 1:51 pm  Leave a Comment  
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A Good Practice

Yesterday I started what I hope will become a routine, and took two of my friends out to introduce them to English swordsmanship and quarterstaff, with a focus on Swetnam. One of them worked with me in the early days of my Italian rapier work (we were far too influenced by sport fencing), and the other has some sport fencing experience.

This is both a blessing and a curse. They know what a lunge is, have experience manipulating their bodies for an antagonistic purpose, and are comfortable holding a weapon. They also drift into incorrect guards and put far too much weight on their front feet.

Overall, this is exciting, and I plan to use our practice sessions to tie together my bits and pieces into a coherent, cohesive understanding of early 17th century English fencing.

Published in: on September 22, 2009 at 3:17 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Videos

Paul Wagner has posted some excellent video on Silver’s swordplay. It should be very useful when considering the context of Swetnam’s work and even, I suspect, Swetnam’s play at the “backe sword,” though I have done little research there, myself.

Also, over on SFI, Martin Janicina has posted a great video of some of Fabris’ rapier plays. The video provides great contrast with Swetnam’s teachings – he would have disapproved of the close measure in which Fabris fights. Swetnam also does not cavazione or disengage in the Italian fashion – instead he uses motions like Silver (try 0:24 into the Silver vid).

Published in: on August 13, 2009 at 2:16 pm  Leave a Comment  
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A Passage

A Passage

A Passage

From Swetnam:

The second opportunity to passe upon your enemie you have, if your enemie to carrie the point so low as your girdle stead, or thereabouts, then you must step in with your left foote, and with your dagger strike awaie the point of his Rapier, and with the same let your Rapier passe unto his bodie, as beforesaid, I meane both at one time.

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Published in: on July 5, 2009 at 1:21 am  Leave a Comment  
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A Slippe

A Slippe

A Slippe

From Swetnam:

Now if your enemy doe charge you with a blow, when as you see the blow comming, plucke in your Rapier, and let the blow slippe, and then answer him againe with a thrust, but bee carefull to plucke in your rapier to that cheeke which hee chargeth you at, so that if the blow doe reach home, you may defend him according unto the rule of the backsword.

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Published in: on June 9, 2009 at 2:19 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Crosse Parry

Crosse Parry

Crosse Parry

From Swetnam:

…the other high guard is to put your rapier on the out-side of your dagger, and with your dagger make a crosse, as it were, by ioyning him in the middest of your rapier, so high as your breast, and your dagger hilt in his usual place, and to defend the thrust, turne down the point of your rapier suddenly, and force him downe with your dagger, by letting them fall both together: this way you may defend a thrust before it come within three foot of your bodie; and this way defendeth the thrust of a staffe, having onlie a rapier and dagger,

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Published in: on May 17, 2009 at 7:26 pm  Leave a Comment  
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