A Good Practice

Yesterday I started what I hope will become a routine, and took two of my friends out to introduce them to English swordsmanship and quarterstaff, with a focus on Swetnam. One of them worked with me in the early days of my Italian rapier work (we were far too influenced by sport fencing), and the other has some sport fencing experience.

This is both a blessing and a curse. They know what a lunge is, have experience manipulating their bodies for an antagonistic purpose, and are comfortable holding a weapon. They also drift into incorrect guards and put far too much weight on their front feet.

Overall, this is exciting, and I plan to use our practice sessions to tie together my bits and pieces into a coherent, cohesive understanding of early 17th century English fencing.

Published in: on September 22, 2009 at 3:17 pm  Leave a Comment  
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An Interesting Blog

Bill Carew of Collegium in Armis has a fairly new blog about “Longstick.”

In this case, “longstick” is just a term for, well, long sticks, generally used with 2 hands for combative purposes. Bill is posting tidbits about a wide range of longstick systems. They’ve been interesting so far – perhaps Swetnam’s staff will get a highlight at some point.

Published in: on August 7, 2009 at 1:09 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Crosse Parry

Crosse Parry

Crosse Parry

From Swetnam:

…the other high guard is to put your rapier on the out-side of your dagger, and with your dagger make a crosse, as it were, by ioyning him in the middest of your rapier, so high as your breast, and your dagger hilt in his usual place, and to defend the thrust, turne down the point of your rapier suddenly, and force him downe with your dagger, by letting them fall both together: this way you may defend a thrust before it come within three foot of your bodie; and this way defendeth the thrust of a staffe, having onlie a rapier and dagger,

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Published in: on May 17, 2009 at 7:26 pm  Leave a Comment  
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